Running a Start Up vs Working for a Multinational

This week, I had an opportunity to be a speaker at the Nocash event in Bucharest, Romania. I am always grateful for chances like that, – because of the conversations they bring and because the other presenters introduce topics, or certain angles of topics, I did not think about before. (And I like presenting, too, fine). As every respectable event in the Financial Services industry these days, Nocash was largely about the Open API Economy – which ultimately means fintechs. Watching many of them in the room and on the stage, I could not help thinking about my own experience of running a company, and, listening to the Nocash fintechs stories, comparing my past to my current situation: starting a business versus working for a multinational.

Funny enough, most people do these two things in the reverse order: start in large corporations and then switch to their own business. So I thought I would lay out my two experiences, comparing them on a number of parameters that matter to me in a wholeheartedly biased way.

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Why I Love Working in Tech

I keep this blog to remind myself that life does not boil down to a job no matter how much you enjoy what you do. So I write about my travels, happiness hacks, my attempts on photography and almost never about work. However, I was reflecting a lot recently on what I do and where I want to get, and I have tapped myself on a back (as much as it is technically possible to tap oneself on a back) for having chosen the most amazing industry to work in. So here is why I love tech.

Level playing field. No need for the bar exam. No need for an MBA. No industry elite. You should just be good at what you do and be passionate about it. Some of the best coders (and CEOs of unicorns, the most valued startups of the Silicon Valley) are school dropouts. Steve Jobs was a school dropout. So were Bill Gates and¬†Larry Ellison (the founder of Oracle and, in case it does not ring a bell, the world’s third richest man at some point). What is common about people in tech though, they are smart. Some academically smart, some consultant-smart, hyper tech savvy and some just know how to market and sell. You learn a lot from them, every day.

Great if you can code. If you can’t, there is still plenty for you to do.¬†Caveat to the point above (and a personal example): it sure does help to have an MBA to get in. However, that means that what you are good at is connecting the moving parts of an ever shifting puzzle. That’s by far not the only thing you can do in tech. It is not even the key part. You can love Sales, Marketing (and I am not even talking digital!), HR, Business Development – and do great stuff in tech.

Never boring, always changing. Nothing is what it used to be half a year ago. Business plans are scrapped after several months, projects get 360 degrees makeover in the middle. Small experimental projects catapult to new business. It is exciting and it is life. Some people call it ambiguity (which to some extent is fair). I just love the pace. And you do learn a lot managing all this complexity to reach your goals, as well.

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